Piano Concerto No.1 with Ashkenazy and Previn 1971

Here you can post anything regarding Rachmaninoff's music on record/cd/dvd and concert experiences
mikhailp
Site Admin
Posts: 99
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 5:43 am

Piano Concerto No.1 with Ashkenazy and Previn 1971

Postby mikhailp » Mon Oct 01, 2007 3:51 am

Does anyone know which edition of the concerto Maestro Vladmir Ashkenazy used for this recording?

Would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
-Misha

RACHBOY
Posts: 283
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 10:14 pm

Re: Piano Concerto No.1 with Ashkenazy and Previn 1971

Postby RACHBOY » Tue Oct 09, 2007 10:53 am

Is it a different version than that is recorded normally?

mikhailp wrote:Does anyone know which edition of the concerto Maestro Vladmir Ashkenazy used for this recording?

Would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
-Misha

Amphissa
Posts: 77
Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 5:00 am
Location: Mount Parnassus

Postby Amphissa » Wed Oct 10, 2007 3:38 am

In his recording with Previn, Ashkenazy played the final version of the 1st concerto. This is the version that has been recorded by everyone - until the turn of this new century.

The original version of Rachmaninoff's 1st concerto was recorded by Ashkenazy -- but with Ashkenazy as conductor of the Helsinki Philharmonic. The pianist is Alexander Guindin.

This is a fascinating CD, because they also play the original version of the 4th concerto.

There are actually 3 different versions of the 1st concerto. The original version was completed in 1890-1891. Rachmaninoff's manuscript of the score is in the collection of the New York Public Library. An "intermediate" revision was completed during the October uprising of 1917. It was published in the Soviet Union. But Rachmaninoff made more revisions. The final version, which was published in 1919, is the version that is commonly played in concert and in recordings.

The recording by Mr. Guindin, with Ashkenazy leading the orchestra, is noticably different from the final version. The influence of Grieg is more apparent, the orchestration is heavier. There are orchestral interludes in the opening movement that do not appear in the final version, and some beautiful episodes that were also dropped.

The original versions of both of these concerti are well worth hearing. The recording by Guindin with Ashkenazy is well performed. Recommended.
"Life without music is a mistake." Nietzsche

kurtdaniel
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Sep 10, 2011 10:15 am

Re: Piano Concerto No.1 with Ashkenazy and Previn 1971

Postby kurtdaniel » Sun Mar 11, 2012 7:10 am

Classical masterpiece of music. This is a particularly hard piece to learn.. needs some intense piano teaching with this.. :)

RACHBOY
Posts: 283
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2004 10:14 pm

Re:

Postby RACHBOY » Sat Mar 17, 2012 1:41 pm

I love the original version of the 4th pianoconcerto!
I call it pianoconcerto no 5 sometimes because it is so very different from the edited later versions.


Amphissa wrote:In his recording with Previn, Ashkenazy played the final version of the 1st concerto. This is the version that has been recorded by everyone - until the turn of this new century.

The original version of Rachmaninoff's 1st concerto was recorded by Ashkenazy -- but with Ashkenazy as conductor of the Helsinki Philharmonic. The pianist is Alexander Guindin.

This is a fascinating CD, because they also play the original version of the 4th concerto.

There are actually 3 different versions of the 1st concerto. The original version was completed in 1890-1891. Rachmaninoff's manuscript of the score is in the collection of the New York Public Library. An "intermediate" revision was completed during the October uprising of 1917. It was published in the Soviet Union. But Rachmaninoff made more revisions. The final version, which was published in 1919, is the version that is commonly played in concert and in recordings.

The recording by Mr. Guindin, with Ashkenazy leading the orchestra, is noticably different from the final version. The influence of Grieg is more apparent, the orchestration is heavier. There are orchestral interludes in the opening movement that do not appear in the final version, and some beautiful episodes that were also dropped.

The original versions of both of these concerti are well worth hearing. The recording by Guindin with Ashkenazy is well performed. Recommended.


Return to “Recordings - CD/DVDs”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest